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Health and Wellbeing

 

Everyday worries are a part of life – so how do you help your children deal with them healthily and in a way that equips them in the future? And what do you do if your child begins to develop irrational worries?

This section will focus on how to boost your children’s wellbeing in and out of school – and will feature a range of tips, internet resources and strategies to help your child.

Worries are a natural part of life and if your cvhild worries a lot, it can be good knowing that out there is just that little bit of extra help to guide them on their learning journey. Often if a child has an irrational worry - something that is not going to happen - they can't see the logic telling them it's not going to happen.

The first strategy you as a parent or guardian can use is trying to break down the worry into pieces with logical steps. For example, if a child feels he or she is going to get themselves in huge trouble if they get two or three times tables wrong in a test, the first thing you can ask them is - have they ever got into trouble for trying and getting things wrong before? The chances are that their teacher will be aware they are nervous about tests (if not have a word with them) and will understand the situation.

Children can often be worried about failure - when there is nothing to worry about if they have tried their best. Teaching children how to deal with failing as well as succeeding is they key to helping them with their worries surrounding schoolwork.

With bigger irrational worries, think of the worry as a house. Knocking down the walls of that house so it can't stand up means talking through the logical aspects of the worry, which means that there is a 99.9999% it won't happen.

Postitive distraction is a great way to help children cope with worries. There is a simple sheet here that helps them note down the happy situations/places/people in their everyday life to really focus on when they feel anxious. Often writing it down also makes it permanent and easier to accept.